Joshua Ozersky  was an American writer, broadcaster, historian, and the founder of the international food festival Meatopia. A graduate Rutge

Ozersk

 Ozersky was a contributing restaurant critic for Newsday (2004–2006), and wrote regularly for the website Slashfood 

Subsequent to "Meat Me in Manhattan"'s publication, Ozersky was a contributing restaurant critic for Newsday (2004–2006), and wrote regularly for the website Slashfood and the New York Law Journal. He became the founding editor of New York Magazine food blog Grub Street,[13] a position he held until 2008, when he moved over to Citysearch as National Restaurant Editor. There he ran a daily food blog based on the model of Grub Street called The Feedbag, along with his regular Citysearch duties.[14] He left in 2009 to start Ozersky.TV, a venture with Eater founder Ben Leventhal, featuring short films about restaurants and cooking, which debuted in July 2010.[15] He wrote the "Taste of America" column for Time from 2010 to 2012. Both Ozersky TV, "Taste of America," and his work in The Wall Street Journal was nominated for James Beard Awards. Essays by Ozersky were also included in "The Best Food Writing" anthologies of 2009, 2012 and 2014.

He was the founding editor of New York magazine's food blog, Grub Street, for which he received James Beard Award. He went on become City Search restaurant editor and publisher of its blog The-Feedbag, whuch has since been hijacked by Canadian Viagra sellers. Ozersky was Editor-at-Large for Esquire, writing about food and restaurants. He also wrote frequently for The Wall Street Journal, Food & Wine, and The New York Observer. 

 

 

 He was the author of several books, including The Hamburger: A History (2008 ISBN 0-300-11758-2), Colonel Sanders and the American Dream (2003 ISBN 0292723822) and Archie Bunker's America: TV in an Era of Change, 1968–1978 (March 2003 ISBN 0-8093-2507-1). He was Editor-at-Large for Esquire, writing about food and restaurants. He also wrote frequently for The Wall Street Journal, Food & Wine, and The New York Observer, among other places. Although read primarily as a food writer, he has said in numerous public appearances that he disliked "food writing" as such, and that his strongest influences were G. K. ChestertonThomas Babington Macaulay and A. J. Liebling.[2][3]

​Bibliography

Ozersky Archives